Friday, December 2, 2011

Do You Believe In Magic?



Last June I blogged about a great radio site for listening to interviews with professional magicians, called The Magic Broadcast. (You can read the post here.) The Magic Broadcast is hosted by Steve Johnson, a local (Sacramento area) magician, who owns the fabulous magic shop in Carmichael, Grand Illusions. This shop has everything that would interest a budding magician: Books, tricks, costumes, juggling lessons, puppets. . . . For those of you in the general area, you can read reviews of the shop and get driving directions here.

But I'm personally excited, because on Monday this week, Steve interviewed ME on his magic broadcast station. Normally his interviews are with professional magicians, like Lee Asher. Why me? Because I wrote a book that featured a fictious local magician, and Steve was interested in how tips on fiction writing could translate into the story patter all good magicians use in order to fool audiences with their tricks. 

It was an enjoyable interview for me. I always love talking about writing, but I've never had to think about how writing might pertain to a magician's performance. The more I thought about it, the more parallels I could see. You can listen to the interview here. Just scroll on down to November 28th interview, and click the play button. 

There was an added enjoyment for me when Steve told me that the magician in my book was believable. I'm used to people telling me the kids in the story are believable, but I was especially pleased to hear that about the magician as well.

Which brings me to the book itself. The story takes place over Christmas vacation, so this is a good time for eight-to-twelve-year-olds who like magic to get this for a Christmas present. (Can't resist that little plug!) It's available in paperback (in the U.S.) and on Kindle (in U.S., England, Spain, France, and Germany.) You can check it out and read reviews of it here .        

(By the way, you have to go to the site to look inside, or peek in the widget up in the right hand margin.)


Meanwhile, DO you believe in magic? If so, what kind? Do you like to do magic tricks? What about friends and kids? Do they? And, have you ever wondered about a magician's personal life when they are not performing at parties and theaters and such?

19 comments:

Ann said...

How exciting for you Elizabeth. Not only the interview but to be told by such an expert your magician was believable. Good for you! Your book sounds great. Will have to check it out, even though I don't have anyone in that age group!

tgayer said...

Ooh Elizabeth! How exciting for you! You must have had so much fun...I love magic, always wished I could transport myself to other places whenever I wanted. Cleopatra's Egypt perhaps?
xx Tee

J. A. Bennett said...

That is so amazing!! What fun for you :)

David P. King said...

That is very cool.

Depending on the magic, I might believe in it. :)

Andrew Leon said...

Not exactly related to your post, but I've been meaning to ask you if Daisy's is based on a real place.

Richard said...

What a good interview. You brought my attention to things I never thought about.

Kimberly said...

How fun and exciting. I remember as a kid I just had to have this magic set and I was so happy when I received it as a gift. It had really cool tricks. :)

Richard said...

Elizabeth,
I've awarded you an award on my blog.

Rosi said...

Ah, Mitty, this is just...magical!

Elizabeth Varadan aka Mrs. Seraphina said...

Richard and Rosi, glad you enjoyed it. Richard, thanks so much for the award.

Kimberly, I've always been fascinated by magicians, as a kid, and as an adult. If I see a show, I'm spellbound.

Tee and J. A., it was fun. Normally, I'd be a little nervous, but not this time, thanks to Steve's ability to put an interviewee at ease.

Ann, yes, that meant a lot, having a magician validate that character. BTW, quite a few adults have liked the book, too.

Andrew, nope. Daisy's is an entirely fictitious donut shop that is placed in an empty building in the exact location as in the book.

David, just be careful if you are offered three wishes.

tfwalsh said...

That is so exciting... huge congrats. Sounds like a lot of fun:)

Elizabeth Varadan aka Mrs. Seraphina said...

Thanks TF, it was.

Rachna Chhabria said...

You must be excited, Elizabeth. Happy for you. Kindle sales are doing well.

Elizabeth said...

Thanks for stopping by my blog and commenting.

NEW FOLLOWER.

Elizabeth

http://silversolara.blogspot.com

Ann Best said...

Elizabeth: I've highlighted your book, among others, on my post for today.
Ann Best, Author of In the Mirror & Other Memoirs

Elizabeth Varadan aka Mrs. Seraphina said...

Thanks, so much, Ann, I'll mosey on over and take a peek.

Jayne said...

Oh that's fantastic! It's lovely for an author to know her characters are believable, and the radio interview sounds very exciting! Will try and listen when not at work. Story-telling is magic, really - books hold the power to make us disappear into another world. So I can see how it ties in.

Have I ever worried about a magician's personal life? I guess I have thought about clowns in that way, and Punch and Judy men - more in a random muse than any careful consideration though!

Elizabeth Varadan aka Mrs. Seraphina said...

Jayne, I agree. Story-telling IS magic. There is nothing like a good book that makes you enter a new world and meet interesting characters. I think reading fiction is one of the great pleasures in life, and to think: It's all done with "smoke and mirrors!" :-)

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